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Update: Bakun, Malaysia

The work at the Bakun dam project in Sarawak, Malaysia (see NorWatch 4/96), was stopped by Malaysian High Court on the 19th of June. Three from a total of over 9 000 indigenous people who has to resettle as a result of the project, took the developers to court. The High Court agreed with them, in that the feasibility study did not considerate their situation. The developer, Ekran Bhd appealed, and on the 13th of July got permission to continue work on the project until the case is settled.
Artikkelen er mer enn to år gammel. Ting kan ha endret seg.
The work at the Bakun dam project in Sarawak, Malaysia (see NorWatch 4/96), was stopped by Malaysian High Court on the 19th of June. Three from a total of over 9 000 indigenous people who has to resettle as a result of the project, took the developers to court. The High Court agreed with them, in that the feasibility study did not considerate their situation. The developer, Ekran Bhd appealed, and on the 13th of July got permission to continue work on the project until the case is settled.

The Swedish/Swiss company ABB got the main contract for the construction of the dam-project, together with the Brazilian constructing company, CPBO. These companies lead a consortium of 120 companies. The Norwegian company Kværner is one of them, and expects to supply turbines worth 120 million US$. It is still undecided whether Alcatel and Dyno will get contracts in the project

On the 5th of July, more than 100 NGOs and over 30 members of the European parliament, through a signature campaign. requested ABB to terminate their contract with Ekran.

Freeport, Indonesia:
In early July, four different indigenous groups demonstrated against Dyno’s big client in Indonesia, the Freeport Mine.

The indigenous people feel trampled on and pressured by Freeport to accept a fund and a supplementary agreement regarding their rights. In their opinion, the agreement does not take care of the interests of the indigenous people.

The establishment of a fund that would secure the local peoples interest and contribute to the cleaning up of the highly polluted area, was an important condition for the renewal of Freeport’s policy with its investors.

Norwatch Newsletter 6/96