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No Norwegian connection in Sudan arms export

International media has today covered a vessel that has been apprehended in Cyprus, for alleged arms transport to Sudan. The ship left Norway few weeks before, the story goes. From what Norwatch can establish, no arms from Norway were part of the shipment.
Artikkelen er mer enn to år gammel. Ting kan ha endret seg.
International media has today covered a vessel that has been apprehended in Cyprus, for alleged arms transport to Sudan. The ship left Norway few weeks before, the story goes. From what Norwatch can establish, no arms from Norway were part of the shipment.


By Erik Hagen
Norwatch

The vessel named ‘Santiago’ was today apprehended by Cypriotic authotiries for transporting arms to Sudan.

"The material aboard the ship is considered prohibited and the ship is not allowed to leave Cyprus. By prohibited material we mean either explosives or other military material," a Cypriotic official told a state run television channel.

Several media have reported that the vessel took the route Norway-Germany-Spain on its way. But from what Norwatch can establish, the vessel’s visit to Norway is not connected to any Sudanese arms transport.

The reason for visiting Norway, was to load a 70 tonne bridge for oil platforms. The offshore equipment was loaded at company’s private harbour close to the city of Haugesund on the Norwegian south west coast.

According to the registries in Norway, the vessel had come from Canada when it arrived Norway. As far as Norwatch can establish, no other cargo was loaded onto the vessel during its stay in the country, apart from regular bunkering.

The Norwegian firm that exported the construction said that the aluminium bridge is destined to Singapore, and not for Sudan. The construction is placed on top of the deck, and visible on photos of the vessel currently offshore Cyprus. The firm said it is regrettable that the shipment is delayed due to the incident in Cyprus.

It is not known to which harbour the offshore bridge was meant to be exported, nor whether explosives were already on board the vessel as it docked in Haugesund.

This story was updated on 24 June 2010, 1 PM.
- Annonse -