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Editorial: Secrets, secrets

This newsletter is among other things concerned with Norwegian investments in Indonesia, a country that the past few months has received worldwide attention due to repeated and increased abuses of the population by the authorities. Norwegian companies follow in the footsteps of the government, which last year sent Prime Minister Gro Harlem Brundtland off on a charm offensive to the regime’s dictator, Suharto.
Artikkelen er mer enn to år gammel. Ting kan ha endret seg.
This newsletter is among other things concerned with Norwegian investments in Indonesia, a country that the past few months has received worldwide attention due to repeated and increased abuses of the population by the authorities. Norwegian companies follow in the footsteps of the government, which last year sent Prime Minister Gro Harlem Brundtland off on a charm offensive to the regime’s dictator, Suharto.

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs (UD) claims that Indonesia "is not a priority area for Norwegian development assistance," although the Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation (NORAD) in 1995 paid NOK 100 million to Norwegian companies starting up new businesses in the country. NorWatch has information suggesting that the amount might even be increased this year. Still not a priority area? NorWatch first made a written request that NORAD make public which enterprises they consider to support for 1996 in Indonesia.  This request was refused pursuant to Section 5 of the Freedom of Information Act. Then we asked if any companies had been refused support from NORAD the past few years in connection with establishing businesses in Indonesia, but this request was also turned down, on account of relations with a foreign power. We have learned one thing: it is difficult for NORAD and the UD to talk about Indonesia. And they are going about their business preferring not to stir up public interest in what is going on.

Norwatch Newsletter 7/96