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Editorial: Carbon Trade

Carbon credit trade may be seen as an oldfashioned sale of indulgences, where the rich is given an opportunity to buy their way out of trouble. A while ago, NorWatch came across another peculiar way of paying indulgences.
Artikkelen er mer enn to år gammel. Ting kan ha endret seg.
Carbon credit trade may be seen as an oldfashioned sale of indulgences, where the rich is given an opportunity to buy their way out of trouble. A while ago, NorWatch came across another peculiar way of paying indulgences.

On the beaches of Chittagong in Bangladesh, scrapping and recycling of outdated Norwegian ships are taking place. The activities inflict great strains on the local communities and the environment. Furthermore, they have contributed to the extinction of the fish stock in coastal areas. Consequently, the fishermen have been forced to install engines in their boats, in order to be able to venture further out to sea.

The local organisation CODEC, among others, has provided financial support for this through micro credit schemes.

CODEC receives funding from a number of foreign donor organisations, such as Strømmestiftelsen in Kristiansand.

The senior council in Strømmestiftelsen is headed by the multimillionaire Terje Mikalsen. Mikalsen is, in addition to being a kind-hearted man, also a shipowner. This fall Mega Tankers, Terje Mikalsen's shipping company, sold most of its fleet for scrapping. In Chittagong.

Norwatch Newsletter 3/00

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