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Dyno lost Freeport-contract: More murders on indigenous population


The conflict between the World's largest gold mine Freeport and the local population on West Papua in Indonesia continues at full speed and recently cost four people their lives. This autums around 1000 indigenous people blocked the mine which, with its planned expansion, will be the World's largest mover of soil mass within the mining sector. Dyno Industrier, which had the lucrative contract on delivery of explosives to Freeport, lost the contract this year.
Artikkelen er mer enn to år gammel. Ting kan ha endret seg.

The conflict between the World's largest gold mine Freeport and the local population on West Papua in Indonesia continues at full speed and recently cost four people their lives. This autums around 1000 indigenous people blocked the mine which, with its planned expansion, will be the World's largest mover of soil mass within the mining sector. Dyno Industrier, which had the lucrative contract on delivery of explosives to Freeport, lost the contract this year.


Harald Eraker
Norwatch

Until this year, Dyno Industries has sold explosives to the Freeport mine, which is owned by the American Freeport McMoRan and the British/Australian Rio Tinto. The controversies around the mine, both due to environment and human rights, have been enormous, but nervertheless Dyno has defended its trade with Freeport (see Norwatch 2/96).

Early this autumn the conflict came to a head again. After two people from the Ekari tribe were killed under mysterious circumstances when they were travelling with a Freeport transport, 1000 people reacted by attacking the mine and blocking the plant.

Soldiers from the Indonesian military were set in to spread the people, and shot and killed two more people from the Ekari tribe. The Indonesian National Commission for Human Rights (KOMNAS) is now investigating the claims that Freeport employees were participated in the murders, in addition to alleged torture and rapes.

Waste giant
According to the organisation Down to Earth, the expansion of the Freeport mine to the large gold field on the Grasberg-mountain, will have additional and serious consequences for both the environment and the local population. The amount of waste from the mines which will be dumped into the environment will increase from the present 125.000 tons a day to 300.000 tons. The waste runs into the Ajkwa-river, and due to the deposits, the river has flooded the country down stream. Because of this, 5000 hectares of rain forest has been «drowned» in the polluted water, and Down To Earth claims that an additional 8000 ha will be flooded before the mining is over.

Information officer Brad Larson in Dyno's explosion division will not comment the ongoing conflicts and the worsened conditions around the Freeport mine, for the simple reason that Dyno lost its contract on delivery of explosives this year. At the same time he makes it clear that this does not mean that Dyno will not attempt to get the contract back some time in the future.

Norwatch Newsletter 17/97