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A brief update on previous NorWatch-issues: Dyno, Malaysia

In the last issue of NorWatch, the focus was on Dyno Industries partly owned company Tenaga Kimia's collaboration with Malaysia's governmental weapon producer, SME.
Artikkelen er mer enn to år gammel. Ting kan ha endret seg.
In the last issue of NorWatch, the focus was on Dyno Industries partly owned company Tenaga Kimia's collaboration with Malaysia's governmental weapon producer, SME.

Dyno investigated the matter, and maintains the following:

"Tenaga Kimia is an independent company producing civil explosives. The only products Tenaga Kimia has sold to SME are some detonating fuse and electrical ignitions which was packed and delivered to the Malaysian Engineer Corps in construction purposes in Malaysia. These products are a part of Tenaga Kimia's portfolio of civil explosives and accessories. Tenaga Kimia is prohibited by law to test military explosives. As such the company does not share the testing fields with SME."

Tenaga Kimia has been granted a license for explosives production at SME's industrial site, which as Dyno states to NorWatch, is a security advantage.

Dyno admits accordingly certain trade with SME, but rejects NorWatch's information that Tenaga Kimia has a broader co-operation with the weapon producer by supplying explosives and equipment and conducting of ammunition.

The NorWatch case in no. 2-97 is based on interviews with SME factory workers, and with the management of both the companies. Which information is correct is an open question.

Norwatch Newsletter 3/97